Sifting through the wreck: Should Carandang take the blame?

Ricky Carandang
The Press Secretary

Political commentator William M. Esposo, who is not known to mince words, took up his metaphorical chair of rage in order to wreck it against Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Secretary Ricky Carandang in the September 7 edition of his The Philippine Star column, tagging Carandang as “terribly wanting” and ultimately liable for the “substandard flow of communications during and after the hostage crisis”. Did the facts justify the energy and space involved in the destruction of (imaginary) furniture?

Esposo ticked off a list of issues that he believed Carandang had mishandled, which follows verbatim below:

  1. The “Where was P-Noy?” issue was raised on the day after the hostage incident and Carandang failed to immediately quash this mistaken notion. It took a full week for Presidential Spokesman Edwin Lacierda to disclose on ANC Talkback what P-Noy was doing during the crisis. That time gap is unacceptable. This issue could have been easily dispelled on the day when it surfaced by narrating the president’s hour by hour activities during the crisis.
  2. The issue of Hong Kong Administrator Donald Tsang’s call to P-Noy was not properly addressed and it made the president look like he was not in charge. Carandang did not even cite that the call to P-Noy was a violation of protocol and therefore we have nothing to be defensive about for not taking it.
  3. The issue of draping the flag on the casket of the hostage taker was not immediately and properly addressed—thereby adding to the bad impression which reflected on the president. The Messaging Secretary should have immediately clarified that this was neither inspired nor committed by the government and that people here freely place the flag on the caskets of those who have been public servants.
  4. Again, the issue which was raised by the Journalist Association of Hong Kong that P-Noy should not blame the media for the bungled rescue was not immediately and properly addressed. Clearly, P-Noy merely cited media for having added to the problems but never did he attempt to put the blame solely on media. Carandang should have taken the Hong Kong journalists to task for raising a falsely premised issue.

Esposo then went on to say that, in spite of the toll that the mismanaged hostage crisis took on the “prestige and public confidence” of the Aquino administration, it nevertheless represented an opportunity for the President to surround himself solely with faithful appointees and rid himself of the company and the service of “stray dogs”, a rhetorical maneuver that conflates incompetence with disloyalty,  and insinuates that Carandang, among other people, is guilty of both. Unless Esposo knows more than he is telling, and can back it up with proof—in which case, he ought to be more explicit, for the sake of the citizenry—the conflation appears to be illogical and unfair.

There can be no denying that great lapses in communication occurred during and after the crisis, and those accountable for such lapses should be dealt with accordingly. A pertinent question, however, would seem to be this: Among the issues that Esposo raised against Carandang, which actually fall under the jurisdiction of the latter as Secretary of the Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Planning Office (PCDSPO)?

According to Executive Order No. 4, which took effect on July 30, 2010, the functions of the PCDSPO are as follows:

a. Coordinate the crafting, formulation, development and enhancement of the messaging system under the Office of the President;
b. Design and recommend responses to issues that arise on a daily basis.
c. Ensure consistency in the messages issued by the Executive Department;
d. Assist in the formulation and implementation of new media strategies for the Office of the President;
e. Assist in research and development of new media instruments;
f. Liaise with the Malacañang Records Office;
g. Control and supervise the conduct of market research, monitoring public opinion, and gathering, use and analysis of other relevant data as may be necessary;
h. Formulate editorial guidelines and policies for state media;
i. Ensure consistency in the implementation of the corporate identity of the Executive Department;
j. Act as custodian of the institutional memory of the Office of the President, which includes the supervision and control of the Presidential Museum and Library, and liaison with the Malacañang Records Office;
k. Perform editorial functions for the Official Gazette; and
l. Perform such other functions as may be directed by the President.

These, on the other hand, are the functions of the Presidential Communications Operations Office (PCOO), which is headed by Secretary Herminio “Sonny” Coloma:

a. Develop and implement necessary guidelines and mechanisms pertaining to the delivery and dissemination of information relating to the policies, programs, official activities and achievements of the President and the Executive Branch;
b. Develop, manage and operate viable government-owned or controlled information dissemination structure / facilities to provide the Office of the President in particular, and the Executive Branch in general, access to the people as an alternative to the private mass media entities;
c. Set up and maintain local and international field offices, where necessary, to ensure that accurate information from the President and the Executive Branch is promptly and efficiently relayed, delivered and disseminated to intended target audiences;
d. Manage, control or supervise, as may be necessary, the various government agencies and offices involved in information gathering and dissemination;
e. Coordinate and cultivate relations with private media;
f. Manage and administer the OP Website and the Web Development Office; and
g. Perform such other functions as the President may assign from time to time.

In view of the language of the Executive Order, the two communications offices, their different responsibilities notwithstanding, are intimately, even inextricably, bound up with one another, as the PCDSPO crafts the material that the PCOO circulates. At the risk of oversimplification, one might put it this way: Carandang creates the message, after which Coloma sends the message.

How, then, can Esposo assign blame wholly to Carandang, while avowing that Coloma was the “least accountable” for any communication problems that arose during the crisis?

A source with the presidential communications group, who spoke on the condition of anonymity owing to lack of authority to comment on the matter, had a different story for The Pro Pinoy Project, saying that the PCDSPO had fulfilled its role and prepared the necessary messages, but the PCOO, which is specifically tasked with media relations, had been unable to disseminate such.

The Pro Pinoy Project was only able to make preliminary contact with Coloma via e-mail and text message, and he has not made any statement as of posting time.

It is worth noting that the elevation of Carandang to his current post had previously prompted Esposo to write a piece questioning the former broadcast journalist’s fitness for the rank—a scathing article that exceeded, both in tone and in apparent intent, other publicly expressed apprehensions about the viability of the presidential communications group: Amando Dornila’s invocation of the image of the Lernaean Hydra, for instance, could be interpreted as a compliment, albeit a rather backhanded one, attesting to the efficacy of people involved in the group, as the hydra is, if nothing else, a powerful creature.

Why, one is moved to ask, is there no love lost between Esposo and Carandang? What motivates all this chair-wrecking? How much of it is driven by national concerns, and how much by parochial ones? Is the fact that Esposo’s column saw print on the same day that Carandang took his oath of office merely a coincidence?

It is no secret, after all, that Esposo is, at the very least, associated with one of two contending factions within the Aquino camp that have been at war since the presidential campaign kicked off last year—the so-called “Samar” faction that reportedly includes Maria Montelibano, a cousin of the President who handled media relations during his campaign, not to mention Coloma himself.

Of course, these factions no longer officially exist, and ought to stop existing unofficially too, as is proper, because infighting only wastes time and resources that could be used productively elsewhere.

Jay Salazar

Jaime Oscar M. Salazar has been blogging intermittently since 2002. He lives and works in Metro Manila. His personal blog is Random Salt.

  • gardo

    I believe Lacierda was indispensable during the crisis. He’s Chinese right?

  • Thom

    So if PCOO of Sec Coloma handles media relations as indicated on EO4, where are their Media relations officers who should have wrangled the media out of the cordoned area? Are they really doing their job?

  • Bugoyboy

    Mike H, sang-ayon ako kay Ochoa at Romulo. Patalsikin na mga unggoy na yan! Hindi ko pa alam kay Lacierda mukhang matino naman. De Lima at least may ginagawa.

    Oo nga naman, nasaan na si Binay?!

    • Jay

      Bugoyboy and Mike H,

      I don’t understand why you’re looking for Binay. He has no role to play in any of this.

  • Mike H— Just a minor correction, I didn’t write this entry. It was written by Jay, aka Random Salt.

  • Mike H

    The blogpost from Cocoy deserves points with the recognition of “…great lapses in communication occurred during and after the crisis, and those accountable for such lapses should be dealt with accordingly.”

    And while on the topic, might as well for Noynoy to evaluate these two people — Ochoa and Lacierda — for lapses in communication and lapses in management. Also Robredo, de Lima and Romulo for not alerting Noynoy that “Hong Thai hijacking” exceeds “Navotas fire”, “dengue epidemic” or “Hacienda Luisita” with regards issues that the office of the president should be concerned about.

    And Binay, too, except Binay is not part of Noynoy’s inner circle and his “crisis committee”.

  • liberdad

    Hindi ba Samar din yang si Ochoa? It make sense

  • Felicity

    ps: CONFIRMED –> “It is no secret, after all, that Esposo is, at the very least, associated with one of two contending factions within the Aquino camp that have been at war since the presidential campaign kicked off last year—the so-called “Samar” faction that reportedly includes Maria Montelibano, a cousin of the President who handled media relations during his campaign, not to mention Coloma himself.”

    THEY WERE IN THE PINBALL GROUP TOGETHER.

  • Felicity

    In the battle for power, the media is used as a weapon when positioning and influence fail. Esposo allowed himself to be used as a weapon — a tool (in both senses of the word).

    The battle has begun. The point of Billy’s column was to do just that. Expect more of this. Sana nalang hindi tayo magpapadala sa ganitong paninira.

  • liberdad

    Mike H, agreed ako sayo. But what I gather from this is that Esposo does so with blindness to the faults of his friend and, well, kakonchaba, Sonny Coloma. Mas malaki ang pagkakamali ang Coloma. Bakit siya pinupuri dito? Ayun naman ata ang punto dito: is it fair? Tingnan mo nga naman ang EO 4. Trabaho nga ni Coloma ang mga pagkakamali na sinasabi ni Esposo, hindi ni Carandang.

    tactics ito noong kampanya e, ng mga Vilar Gibo Aquino. Pati ba naman ngayon na nasa gobyerno ginagamit parin nina Maria Montelibano?

    ” infighting only wastes time and resources that could be used productively elsewhere.”

  • Mike H

    Pointing out flaws and mistakes is one of the engines towards getting to better even if they may make many persons and their allies uncomfortable.

    ————
    “Our problems now, in two or three years we can say that they are laughable when we recall that they were not that grave,” […] said [by President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino] in Filipino.