Products the Philippines produces that use child labor

The Philippines currently produces 12 products that employ child labor and ignominiously occupies a place in the top 10 list of countries that put children to work.

The products, according to this:

  1. Bananas
  2. Coconuts
  3. Corn
  4. Fashion Accessories
  5. Gold
  6. Hogs
  7. Pornography (!??!)
  8. Pryotechnics
  9. Rice
  10. Rubber
  11. Sugarcane
  12. Tobacco

What’s glaringly missing from that list are those who are ‘employed’ as maids, servants, and those who have had to find means fend for themselves due to absent or unemployed parents.

From http://www.productsofslavery.org/

The ProPinoy Project

  • ctj

    Check out the data and sources page of productsofslavery.org – it uses the ILO’s definitions of forced and child labour. Whilst this focussed on products, rather than services (like domestic workers etc) might have been good to see included some data about the numbers of children working and people being forced to work.

  • Anonymous

    UNICEF has a definition of child labor. Example — helping parents around the farm or helping with housework — not child labor. A 12-year old who puts 12 hours a week to feed the chicken or tend to the family’s backyard garden is not doing child labor. But a 10-year old who zips in and out between cars and jeepneys to sell cigarettes and bubble-gum : child labor. A 7-year old who earns money (to help the unemployed or underemployed parents) by doing scavenger-work or as a maid — child labor.

  • Anonymous

    UNICEF has a definition of child labor.

  • Manuelbuencamino

    it might be helpful to see how these people define child labor. Are they using country specific standards or are they going by the old one size fits all approach?

    • I’m curious, too. Of course, if they’re going to be comparing countries, it would be best not to use country-specific standards, but a one size fits all approach isn’t always fair to different countries under some circumstances, as well. Is a child helping his/her family on the farm considered child labor?* Is every instance of child labor necessarily negative?

      I’m not sure it’s fair to include child pornography in the list. Child pornography is illegal, and can be—and is—made in probably every country in the world.

      We need a strong focus on keeping our kids in school, and making the schools better learning environments for all kids, so that there’s not a need for so much child labor.


      *Yes, apparently it is. But I believe a lot of children help their parents on the farm in America, as well. At least I know my parents did when they were growing up.

  • Manuelbuencamino

    it might be helpful to see how these people define child labor. Are they using country specific standards or are they going by the old one size fits all approach?

    • I’m curious, too. Of course, if they’re going to be comparing countries, it would be best not to use country-specific standards, but a one size fits all approach isn’t always fair to different countries under some circumstances, as well. Is a child helping his/her family on the farm considered child labor?* Is every instance of child labor necessarily negative?

      I’m not sure it’s fair to include child pornography in the list. Child pornography is illegal, and can be—and is—made in probably every country in the world.

      We need a strong focus on keeping our kids in school, and making the schools better learning environments for all kids, so that there’s not a need for so much child labor.


      *Yes, apparently it is. But I believe a lot of children help their parents on the farm in America, as well. At least I know my parents did when they were growing up.