Manila makes it to Brookings' Top Ten Cities

Derek Thompson of The Atlantic writes

Grading each metropolis by the growth of its income and employment, the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program found that the world’s fastest recovering cities are overwhelmingly in three key areas: China and India, Southeast Asian islands, and Latin America.

In the top 10, at number 9 for the first time ever was the city of Manila. Here’s what The Atlantic had to say

Talk about relying on overseas capital: The Philippines depends so heavily on remittances from far-flung Filipino workers that a 7 percent boost in mailed cash this year dramatically improved the country’s economic projections for 2010. Healthy tourism and demand for IT products helped Manila crack the top ten in Brookings’ rankings for the first time.

Here is the full list of cities in ascending order:

30. Hong Kong 29. Cairo, Egypt 28. Alexandria, Egypt 27. Montreal, Canada 26. Austin, Texas 25. Sao Paulo, Brazil 24. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 23. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 22. Belo Horizonte, Brazil 21. Taipei, Taiwan 20. Jakarta, Indonesia 19. Buenos Aires, Argentina 18.Tianjin, China 17. Chennai, India 16. Kolkata, India 15. Guadalajara, Mexico 14. Melbourne, Australia 13. Bangalore, India 12. Mumbai, India 11. Hyderbad, India 10. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 9. Manila, Philippines 8. Beijing, China 7. Guangzhou, China 6. Shanghai, China 5. Santiago, Chile 4. Singapore 3. Lima, Peru 2. Shenzhen, China 1. Istanbul, Turkey.

If we are to listen to Richard Florida, the city where you live says a lot about you. After the tragedy that was inflicted on the capital back in August, this piece should help dispel a lot of myths regarding Manila as a non-destination. After the fiasco involving the Department of Tourism campaign for the Philippines, this should be welcome news.

For once, it is good to see us being placed back on the map. The question is, what do our other major cities have to do to gain the same status?

Doy Santos aka The Cusp

Doy Santos is an international development consultant who shuttles between Australia and the Philippines. He maintains a blog called The Cusp: A discussion of new thinking, new schools of thought and fresh ideas on public policy (www.thecusponline.org) and tweets as @thecusponline. He holds a Master in Development Economics from the University of the Philippines and an MS in Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

  • GabbyD

    i wonder: is this metro manila or really just city of manila?

    coz manila, especially the old city and china town, is really pretty and relatively clean.

    • Thanks for your question, Gabby. I think given the way the rankings were assembled (they looked at employment and GVA or gross value added stats) and given the way these stats are reported and made available, it was probably the National Capital Region being referred to as Manila.

      • GabbyD

        yeah ur probably right. makes sense.

  • GabbyD

    i wonder: is this metro manila or really just city of manila?

    coz manila, especially the old city and china town, is really pretty and relatively clean.

    • Thanks for your question, Gabby. I think given the way the rankings were assembled (they looked at employment and GVA or gross value added stats) and given the way these stats are reported and made available, it was probably the National Capital Region being referred to as Manila.

      • GabbyD

        yeah ur probably right. makes sense.

  • Doy, I was just in Cairo last month. Considering that Egypt’s economy is stronger than ours, with their massive traffic jams, crazier drivers than in EDSA, dusty air and street chaos sabi ko I will never complain about Manila again haha! So I’m not surprised nasa #30 lng sila compared to our #9 (wooot!) But it was still an amazing holiday 🙂

    • Hi Felicity, it’s good that being well-traveled, you have been able to gain some perspective with regard to our developmental situation. It’s true that these things we curse and complain all the time about are nothing compared to what some of our rivals face. I was in Colombo not too long ago, and I noticed the same problems besetting that city such as congestion, pollution, urban migration and security. This is what I have been saying, that we are not doing too bad. In fact, I have said in this space that if this keeps up, there will be a labor shortage in the not too distant future.

  • Doy, I was just in Cairo last month. Considering that Egypt’s economy is stronger than ours, with their massive traffic jams, crazier drivers than in EDSA, dusty air and street chaos sabi ko I will never complain about Manila again haha! So I’m not surprised nasa #30 lng sila compared to our #9 (wooot!) But it was still an amazing holiday 🙂

    • Hi Felicity, it’s good that being well-traveled, you have been able to gain some perspective with regard to our developmental situation. It’s true that these things we curse and complain all the time about are nothing compared to what some of our rivals face. I was in Colombo not too long ago, and I noticed the same problems besetting that city such as congestion, pollution, urban migration and security. This is what I have been saying, that we are not doing too bad. In fact, I have said in this space that if this keeps up, there will be a labor shortage in the not too distant future.