Governments should not have a monopoly on the Internet

On Google’s blog, Vint Cerf popularly known as the Father of the Internet for his contribution to the development of TCP/IP, the protocol that makes the Internet possible wrote,

The beauty of the Internet is that it’s not controlled by any one group. Its governance is bottoms-up—with academics, non-profits, companies and governments all working to improve this technological wonder of the modern world. This model has not only made the Internet very open—a testbed for innovation by anyone, anywhere—it’s also prevented vested interests from taking control.

But last week the UN Committee on Science and Technology announced that only governments would be able to sit on a working group set up to examine improvements to theIGF—one of the Internet’s most important discussion forums. This move has been condemned by the Internet Governance Caucus, the Internet Society (ISOC), the International Chamber of Commerce and numerous other organizations—who have published a joint letter(PDF) and launched an online petition to mobilize opposition. Today, I have signed that petition on Google’s behalf because we don’t believe governments should be allowed to grant themselves a monopoly on Internet governance. The current bottoms-up, open approach works—protecting users from vested interests and enabling rapid innovation. Let’s fight to keep it that way.

Posted by Vint Cerf, Chief Internet Evangelist

Cerf is right. The last 30 years the Internet is driven by The Internet Society has done the world much good. It couldn’t have been made possible, if it was driven by governments, or the UN.

Cocoy Dayao

Cocoy is the Chief Technology Officer of Lab Rats Technica, a Digital Consulting company that specialises in DevOps, iOS, and Web Apps, E-Commerce sites, Cybersecurity and Social Media consulting. He is a technology enthusiast, political junkie and social observer who enjoys a good cup of coffee, comic books, and tweets as @cocoy on twitter.

Cocoy is also the Managing Director and Editor-in-Chief of the ProPinoy Project.

Cocoy considers himself to be Liberal.

  • cocoy

    My apologies. Title has been edited. yes, his position is “Should NOT,” and I agree with it.

  • cocoy

    My apologies. Title has been edited. yes, his position is “Should NOT,” and I agree with it.

  • Let’s get it right folks he is not for a monopoly:

    Today, I have signed that petition on Google’s behalf because we “””””don’t believe””””” governments should be allowed to grant themselves a monopoly on Internet governance. The current bottoms-up, open approach works—protecting users from vested interests and enabling rapid innovation. Let’s fight to keep it that way. #

    Posted by Vint Cerf, Chief Internet Evangelist #

  • Let’s get it right folks he is not for a monopoly:

    Today, I have signed that petition on Google’s behalf because we “””””don’t believe””””” governments should be allowed to grant themselves a monopoly on Internet governance. The current bottoms-up, open approach works—protecting users from vested interests and enabling rapid innovation. Let’s fight to keep it that way. #

    Posted by Vint Cerf, Chief Internet Evangelist #

  • bdelachapelle

    Attention : the title of the post is a serious misquote 🙂 Vint says : governments SHOULD NOT have a monopoly on Internet GOVERNANCE. not that they should have such a monopoly…

  • bdelachapelle

    Attention : the title of the post is a serious misquote 🙂 Vint says : governments SHOULD NOT have a monopoly on Internet GOVERNANCE. not that they should have such a monopoly…

  • bdelachapelle

    Attention : the title of the post is a serious misquote 🙂 Vint says : governments SHOULD NOT have a monopoly on Internet GOVERNANCE. not that they should have such a monopoly…