PNoy's Porsche

Everywhere it would seem people like to talk about the President’s Porsche. (No, not the image above, that’s just a Porsche I got from the webs). What’s with the fascination with the car?

As Buwayahman pointed out, the President used his personal funds. Funds that no one, but the President ought to be concerned about, because it is none of our business. How he spends his money, and who he spends his free time with is his problem, not the nation’s. His Statement of Assets and Liabilities show he isn’t a poor man. And everyone who voted for him knows that he isn’t poor. How the President spends our money, now that’s a different thing.

This tweet by @angmungo asked, “Why are people talking about this car? Because there’s not much else to talk about when it comes to the President’s acts.”

Actually, there are loads of things to talk about. Things that are not sexy and doesn’t attract headlines, traffic and definitely doesn’t boost ratings. So boring has our national life become that we worry about the President’s car, or distractions like Charter Change.

But the challenges of our time haven’t changed. They’re just different because people— however imperfect the solution— are working to solve them.

What are some of those issues?

Stuart Santiago for example is talking about Eat Bulaga versus RH!

Francis Acero is talking about The Equal Protection Clause.

Dean Jorge Bocobo is all over Education’s Big Budget, and even Bigger Agenda.

There is the issue of General Garcia, which the Palace as provided a brief on.

And the Philippine economy is gaining traction.

There are many issues in the day, and people focus on the least important of the lot. What does that say about the quality of our discourse?


photo credit: Some rights reserved by FotoSleuth

Cocoy Dayao

Cocoy is the Chief Technology Officer of Lab Rats Technica, a Digital Consulting company that specialises in DevOps, iOS, and Web Apps, E-Commerce sites, Cybersecurity and Social Media consulting. He is a technology enthusiast, political junkie and social observer who enjoys a good cup of coffee, comic books, and tweets as @cocoy on twitter.

Cocoy is also the Managing Director and Editor-in-Chief of the ProPinoy Project.

Cocoy considers himself to be Liberal.

  • I agree brother. The purchase of the car doesn’t define his presidency. I hope people would start talking about REAL ISSUES. Not that I’m 100% in favor of PNoy’s decisions but these topics about PNoy’s real amusing how the media can sensationalize those that shouldn’t be and turn blind to some of the things that matter.

    • Anonymous

      I don’t quite know about “ignore the Porsche, it’s his business”. This is not yet big enough where Congress should hold a 2-day hearing so Pilipinas finds out who was Porsche previous owner, but you know, had this happened in 2010 with GMA, Ellen Tordesillas plus Yellow-Army folks would raise this — that the suspicion can be : The Porsche can be a gift with the gift-giver already knowing what he gets in return. It happens with politics, right?

      But PresiNoynoy, because he has nothing to hide, then PresiNoynoy should volunteer more information about the car purchase. Where did the Porsche come from, was it super-cheap because it was a gift? Only the guilty will refuse an audit — kasabihan sa Pilipinas.

      • Bert

        “…had this happened in 2010 with GMA, Ellen Tordesillas plus Yellow-Army folks would raise this — that the suspicion can be….”-UP n

        Yeah, right, UP n. Something to do with reputation, you know.

        • Anonymous

          That is shoe- or notebooks-and-pencil sales talk, , Bert, because that’s the wrong way to do quality control, For high-value super-critical products and processes, you don’t do quality control AFTER things have gone wrong. You verify compliance, period. And Noynoy should know this, after all, he has held management positions before.

          And the problem of catching AFTER “they” have done is that the government is able to recover only 45-cents on a dollar. As Reagan had said, trust, but –audit– verify.

          • Bert

            Yeah, right again, UP n. As you can see, the high-end product is running very well and efficiently, no glitch, except some familiarizations along the way, heheh. Adding some flashy and glossy accessories here and there from time to time will not affect compliance and quality performance unless some malicious souls would want to try their hands at sabotage and spread and scattered obstacles in and around the engine or by imputing silly and derogatory advertisement related to the glossy accessory.

            The public will judge and Ellen Tordesillas will have her say later as she had her say with GMA.

  • I agree brother. The purchase of the car doesn’t define his presidency. I hope people would start talking about REAL ISSUES. Not that I’m 100% in favor of PNoy’s decisions but these topics about PNoy’s real amusing how the media can sensationalize those that shouldn’t be and turn blind to some of the things that matter.

    • Anonymous

      I don’t quite know about “ignore the Porsche, it’s his business”. This is not yet big enough where Congress should hold a 2-day hearing so Pilipinas finds out who was Porsche previous owner, but you know, had this happened in 2010 with GMA, Ellen Tordesillas plus Yellow-Army folks would raise this — that the suspicion can be : The Porsche can be a gift with the gift-giver already knowing what he gets in return. It happens with politics, right?

      But PresiNoynoy, because he has nothing to hide, then PresiNoynoy should volunteer more information about the car purchase. Where did the Porsche come from, was it super-cheap because it was a gift? Only the guilty will refuse an audit — kasabihan sa Pilipinas.

      • Bert

        “…had this happened in 2010 with GMA, Ellen Tordesillas plus Yellow-Army folks would raise this — that the suspicion can be….”-UP n

        Yeah, right, UP n. Something to do with reputation, you know.

        • Anonymous

          That is shoe- or notebooks-and-pencil sales talk, , Bert, because that’s the wrong way to do quality control, For high-value super-critical products and processes, you don’t do quality control AFTER things have gone wrong. You verify compliance, period. And Noynoy should know this, after all, he has held management positions before.

          • Bert

            Yeah, right again, UP n. As you can see, the high-end product is running very well and efficiently, no glitch, except some familiarizations along the way, heheh. Adding some flashy and glossy accessories here and there from time to time will not affect compliance and quality performance unless some malicious souls would want to try their hands at sabotage and spread and scattered obstacles in and around the engine or by imputing silly and derogatory advertisement related to the glossy accessory.

            The public will judge and Ellen Tordesillas will have her say later as she had her say with GMA.

  • mario taporco

    Geewhiz Joe,

    Where you in a rush to go fishing that day in your 53 Ford. ๐Ÿ˜‰

  • mario taporco

    Geewhiz Joe,

    Where you in a rush to go fishing that day in your 53 Ford. ๐Ÿ˜‰

  • Joe America

    I found interesting a report on the news this morning that American banks are back to paying big millions out in bonuses to executives, but Americans don’t mind so much because they trust the government less than banks, and don’t want government to start messing with THEIR salaries, too

    Why should anyone have the presumptive right to manage what car the Philippine president drives? Who cares . . .

    Why I recall back in the prior century when I got my first car. It was this brown ’53 Ford. That baby had a stick shift on the steering wheel, and overdrive so that if I stomped on the gas at 50 MPH, it would surge ahead to 55, the g-force pasting my back to the seat cushion as I dodged the horses and other paraphernalia on the highway. Christ, that was fast in those days . . .

    I wonder what that Porsche will do on the open national highway? Probably nail a lot of those stray dogs blundering about and maybe a tricycle or two . . .

    Boy howdy . . .

    • cocoy

      hahaha. yeah, Joe. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • Bert

      Good gracious, Joe my friend, I never thought you’re as young as your Gravatar! :>)

  • Joe America

    I found interesting a report on the news this morning that American banks are back to paying big millions out in bonuses to executives, but Americans don’t mind so much because they trust the government less than banks, and don’t want government to start messing with THEIR salaries, too

    Why should anyone have the presumptive right to manage what car the Philippine president drives? Who cares . . .

    Why I recall back in the prior century when I got my first car. It was this brown ’53 Ford. That baby had a stick shift on the steering wheel, and overdrive so that if I stomped on the gas at 50 MPH, it would surge ahead to 55, the g-force pasting my back to the seat cushion as I dodged the horses and other paraphernalia on the highway. Christ, that was fast in those days . . .

    I wonder what that Porsche will do on the open national highway? Probably nail a lot of those stray dogs blundering about and maybe a tricycle or two . . .

    Boy howdy . . .

    • cocoy

      hahaha. yeah, Joe. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • Bert

      Good gracious, Joe my friend, I never thought you’re as young as your Gravatar! :>)

  • Manuelbuencamino

    It’s not an issue worth anybody’s while.

    • Anonymous

      Why spare the gander from what what one would do to a goose? Had this happened in 2010 with GMA, Ellen Tordesillas plus Yellow-Army folks would raise this — that the suspicion can be : The Porsche can be a gift with the gift-giver already knowing what he gets in return. It happens with politics, right?

      deptJustice may be the wrong one to investigate the purchase. A constitutionally-safe entity like the Office of the Ombudsman may be the better office to investigate if there is more behind the Porsche that relate to the “… walang korap, walang mahirap” mantra.

      Next-step should be pretty obvious. Because he has nothing to hide, then PresiNoynoy should volunteer more information about the car purchase. Only the guilty will refuse an audit — kasabihan sa Pilipinas.

  • Manuelbuencamino

    It’s not an issue worth anybody’s while.

    • Anonymous

      The Porsche can be a gift with the gift-giver expecting some favors in return. It can be.

      deptJustice may be the wrong one to investigate the purchase. A constitutionally-safe entity like the Office of the Ombudsman may be the better office to investigate if there is more behind the Porsche that relate to the “… walang korap, walang mahirap” mantra.

  • Anonymous

    I think before everyone lashes out against this, we have to ask an objective question:

    How much cash did he actually shell out for the thing?

    Reports varied from “swapped” to “bought a PHP4.5Million automobile” which confuses everyone. I mean if PNoy got the Porsche for 1 peso, I think people ought to shut up.

    But if he shelled out millions maybe — just maybe — people have a reason to wag their tongues.

    So what is it really?

    • cocoy

      Jon,

      I personally don’t think it is a problem whether the price is PHP1 or PHP10M. Whether it is brand new or second hand even or if the car was a swap thing. It isn’t our money. Neither property is the people’s. It is the personal business of the president. It is his personal property. If he bought it for five million and he was cheated or he could have gotten it cheaper from someone else, imho, it isn’t our problem either.

      It isn’t even our problem, imho even if he can’t afford his new toy, like say he borrowed the money, but can’t pay his creditor. To me, that’s the business between him and his creditor, for example.

      We live in a free country where the fruits of our labor— no matter who you are— should be enjoyed, even if he is president.

      The issue to me is kinda like for example, you buy a car, and your parents and your cousins would ask, “why did you buy a honda when you could have gotten a toyota or bought insurance or saved the money?” i mean, it’s your money right, whether the decision was a right one or not, that’s your business. You didn’t steal it. You worked hard. Hell, as I mentioned above, even if you borrowed the money from a loan shark, and couldn’t pay back, it is still your business and not anyone else’s. You decide how to save, invest or spend it. It isn’t anyone’s business how you spend your money, not even your kids, well except your wife, I suppose.

      I think it is the same thing with PNoy. We’re the relatives, and we’re telling him what is, and what shouldn’t he do. We rub our noses in his business.

      I will take issue though if it is our money that he bought the car with. The president published his statement of assets and liabilities, and I think it is fair point to chastise him if he doesn’t do his job, or he stole the money to buy for his toy.

      • Anonymous

        I think it already is government policy (and if not, then it should) to audit events when a very high government official shows ownership of luxury items. It is reasonable when people ask what Presi-Noy paid for the car. And I will worry if he paid super-cheap for the Porsche because the next question becomes was it a gift and “….what did the seller expect in return?”

  • Anonymous

    I think before everyone lashes out against this, we have to ask an objective question:

    How much cash did he actually shell out for the thing?

    Reports varied from “swapped” to “bought a PHP4.5Million automobile” which confuses everyone. I mean if PNoy got the Porsche for 1 peso, I think people ought to shut up.

    But if he shelled out millions maybe — just maybe — people have a reason to wag their tongues.

    So what is it really?

    • cocoy

      Jon,

      I personally don’t think it is a problem whether the price is PHP1 or PHP10M. Whether it is brand new or second hand even or if the car was a swap thing. It isn’t our money. Neither property is the people’s. It is the personal business of the president. It is his personal property. If he bought it for five million and he was cheated or he could have gotten it cheaper from someone else, imho, it isn’t our problem either.

      It isn’t even our problem, imho even if he can’t afford his new toy, like say he borrowed the money, but can’t pay his creditor. To me, that’s the business between him and his creditor, for example.

      We live in a free country where the fruits of our labor— no matter who you are— should be enjoyed, even if he is president.

      The issue to me is kinda like for example, you buy a car, and your parents and your cousins would ask, “why did you buy a honda when you could have gotten a toyota or bought insurance or saved the money?” i mean, it’s your money right, whether the decision was a right one or not, that’s your business. You didn’t steal it. You worked hard. Hell, as I mentioned above, even if you borrowed the money from a loan shark, and couldn’t pay back, it is still your business and not anyone else’s. You decide how to save, invest or spend it. It isn’t anyone’s business how you spend your money, not even your kids, well except your wife, I suppose.

      I think it is the same thing with PNoy. We’re the relatives, and we’re telling him what is, and what shouldn’t he do. We rub our noses in his business.

      I will take issue though if it is our money that he bought the car with. The president published his statement of assets and liabilities, and I think it is fair point to chastise him if he doesn’t do his job, or he stole the money to buy for his toy.

      • Anonymous

        I think it already is government policy (and if not, then it should) to audit such personal purchases. I would worry about what Presi-Noy paid for the car. And I will worry if he paid super-cheap for the Porsche because the next question becomes was it a gift and “….what did the seller expect in return?”