traffic accidents

Notorious bus lines have lost their social license to operate

Don Mariano Transit Corp accident

Public transportation is a public good, and therefore should not be left to untrammeled markets to regulate.

That is in effect what has happened under our regulatory regime since the 1980s, as I have argued before.

The recent tragedy involving Don Mariano bus line which led to the death of 22 commuters is a grim reminder of the need to reform our public transport franchising system. Our bus lines are putting the riding public at risk with their reckless behaviour. They are becoming instruments of mass destruction, rather than mass transit. And the international media has started to take notice, which not only puts lives, but jobs at risk, due to the impact on tourism.

It is time to revoke the licenses of these transport operators who have continued to disregard traffic rules, like speed limits on skyways, in the pursuit of profit. They have already lost their social license to operate, it is time to revoke their legal right to do so. To allow them and the industry to continue down this road of destruction is just outright madness.

Our public regulator, the LTFRB must take a more proactive stance. They have already stated their intention to cull bus lines through natural attrition because of the over-servicing of certain routes, which along with the boundary system applied by bus lines, has led to the dangerous habits of drivers.

It is time for LTFRB to realise that this policy is irrational. We cannot wait for franchises to expire before taking action. Bus operators should be suspended in the first instance. Their entire fleet must be grounded until they are able to prove that they have dealt with safety concerns, either by changing their incentive package to drivers, or through driver re-education programs to avoid recidivism.

Once their franchise comes up for renewal, the number of traffic violations and accidents leading to injury and death must be taken into account. Operators who persistently violate traffic rules and place the public (both commuters and pedestrians) at risk, must not have their licenses renewed. It is time for the public transport regulator to show some resolve in dealing with this problem.

 

Murdering buses

Far too many people have died on Commonwealth Avenue in Quezon City. Rampaging buses have been blamed. Buses in the Metropolis are private businesses. Bus driver wages are commonly on a commission basis— the more people they ferry, the better. Just like Jeepneys do, and just like Cabs do.

Is this a symptom of a bigger problem?

There are really fewer bus stops in the city, or jeepney stops. There are no fixed schedules for example that the bus will arrive at say 2 PM. A school of thought may point to a government that has abdicated its role in public transportation.

Is the reason simply because the government doesn’t control things? In New York City, the Metropolitan Transit Authority controls every form of public transport in New York state. That includes the subway system, and police. The MTA is a public corporation, but because of the economic downturn it is US$31 billion in debt.

So if a public corporation can rack up that much debt, and the private sector seem unwieldy, where then can people stand?

At the end of the day, it is less an issue about the Metro Manila Development Authority or an economic one for that matter. It is an issue of justice, and the culture of impunity that exist everywhere. The sooner Drivers are really punished for violating traffic, and actually get to pay fines the better. The sooner the apprehending officer apprehends rightly traffic offenders and cease doing so only because they don’t have food for lunch, the better it is for our streets.

We call them accidents because that’s what they are. It doesn’t mean, people are powerless, or there is nothing we can do about it. Sadly, it the biggest problem of traffic and traffic accidents it the philippines has more to do with fighting a culture of impunity.

Photo credit: express000, Some rights reserved